Papaloquelite : The Butterfly Herb* (salsa recipe included)

*See Post : Papaloquelite : What’s in a name? Why “butterfly” herb? papalotl.Principal English Translation:a butterfly (see Molina and Karttunen); also, a person’s name (attested as male and possibly female) Alonso de Molina:papalotl. mariposa.Alonso de Molina, Vocabulario en lengua castellana y mexicana y mexicana y castellana, 1571, part 2, Nahuatl to Spanish, f. 79v. col. 2. Thanks to Joe Campbell for providing the transcription. Frances … Continue reading Papaloquelite : The Butterfly Herb* (salsa recipe included)

31 Alimentos que México dio al mundo : 31 foods that Mexico gave to the World

Mexico (and the Americas in general) has given much to the worlds food larder. We are familiar with many of these foods even though we might not know where exactly the came from (1). We can thank the Americas for staple foods such as corn, potatoes, tomatoes, beans (2), squashes, chiles, avocados, the turkey, vanilla and cacao (3) as well as the highly nutritious seeds … Continue reading 31 Alimentos que México dio al mundo : 31 foods that Mexico gave to the World

Papalo and Pipicha. Skunk Weed?

Hierba de Zorrillo Amongst the names papalo has accrued lies the not altogether unexpected moniker “skunk weed”, although I have never found the word “zorrillo” used and for some reason online translators always come back with “hierba mofeta”; the word used is mampuritu (1) and mampurite (2) (Morton 1968). My grasp of Spanish is rudimentary at best and there is no doubt I am missing … Continue reading Papalo and Pipicha. Skunk Weed?

Tlapanche

also called, quelite de venado, lapandzi, lapantsi, átlapántsin, aclapanchis, papalo de cerro, papalo criollo Jesús Hoyos Hernández on his blog (1) speaks of this herb. It is not very well known and can be confused with papalo as it is similar in appearance although, according to Jesús, its aroma and taste is very different. This plant has previously been identified as P.punctatum but P.pringlei, P.ruderale, P.nutans (2) and P.calcicola have … Continue reading Tlapanche

Papaloquelite : What’s in a name?

Porophyllums were first described by Linnaeus in 1753. The University of Arizona has specimens in their Herbarium collected from the Sonora and Chihuahua regions in the 1800’s. The Latin translations of some of the names in the poreleaf family are as follows; porophyllum translates to “pore – leaf”, this is due to the conspicuous presence of large oil glands on the leaf; ruderale refers to the plant “growing … Continue reading Papaloquelite : What’s in a name?

Pápaloquelite : Porophyllum macrocephalum

Porophyllum macrocephalum Also called : Papaloquelite, Papaloqulitl (Nahuatl),Papalokilitl, Quelite de mariposa, Papalo, pápalo rollizo, (“plump” papalo), pucsnan’caca (Totonac), quelites oloroso, ahoyacaquilitl (sweet scented edible plant), chipaca, chaoacocopin, xpechukil, Pech´uk (Yucatán Maya), xac’ani (Otomi), wacamacho, ukche, tepegua (Queretaro), tepelcacho (Chilapa, Guerrero), tepelcasho, Pápalo macho, pápalo hembra (Mixteca), Chapahua (Totonaco, Veracruz Coast) Chapahuate (Totonaco), chivatillo (Michoacán), Mesis, Tepehua (Hidalgo), liendrilla, yerba de peo, yerba de chulo (black vulture grass), … Continue reading Pápaloquelite : Porophyllum macrocephalum