Agave Syrup. A Healthy Alternative to Sugar?

Agave syrup has been touted as an organic, raw food, healthy alternative to sugar but what exactly is it? The agave species is native to México and the southwestern United States of America. They are neither a cactus nor a relative of the aloe plant which they resemble. There are over 200 varieties of this plant. The agave was known as “metl” in the lingua franca … Continue reading Agave Syrup. A Healthy Alternative to Sugar?

Nutritional Value of Aguamiel

Nutritional value of aguamiel from Agave atrovirens Minerals mg/100 g Potassium (K) 120.44 Calcium (Ca) 11.70 Zinc (Zn) 0.18 Iron (Fe) 0.81 Sodium (Na) 0.83 Copper (Cu) 0.07 Magnesium (Mg) 0.55 Selenium (Se) 0.047 Water-soluble vitamins mg/100 g Thiamine (B1) 0.10 Riboflavin (B2) 0.38 Niacin (B3) 4.77 Pyridoxine (B6) 0.57 Ascorbic acid (C) 17.99 Amino acids mg/100 g Aspartic acid 7.91 Glutamic acid 20.08                                                Serine 4.48 … Continue reading Nutritional Value of Aguamiel

The Agave, Barbacoa and Mixiotes

The leaves of the maguey, called “pencas” are utilised for numerous purposes. One variety is used to create the fibre known as sisal while the thicker varieties can be cooked and eaten. Even the thorns were used as needles and for the practice of auto sacrifice. Some religious devotees and priests would pierce their earlobes, tongues or genitals with the thorns and collect the blood … Continue reading The Agave, Barbacoa and Mixiotes

Flor de Jamaica (Hibiscus sabdariffa)

Also called : Roselle, Rosella, Red sorrel, Karkady, Karkade Another popular street food in México are the agua frescas (fresh waters or cool waters). These are light non-alcoholic beverages which are flavoured with fruits, cereals, flowers, or seeds blended with sugar and water. Chia seed is often added. These drinks are typically served from large barrel-shaped glass containers and can be found in markets, taquerias, tianguis and on … Continue reading Flor de Jamaica (Hibiscus sabdariffa)

Colonche

Colonche (or nochoctli) is another Mesoamerican fermented drink similar in design to tepache and pulque. It is produced from the tuna fruits of several species of the nopal cactus (most notably O.strepthacantha – see previous page) and is fermented using wild yeasts. Its shelf life, like that of tepache is somewhat longer than that of pulque and it can be expected to last for as long as 14-15 days. Colonche is found … Continue reading Colonche

Medicinal uses of Xoconostle

The habitual consumption of the skin and fruit of the xoconostle can be useful in the control of serum glucose in individuals with Type 2 diabetes. In healthy people xoconostle can help prevent hyperglycaemic states and potentially reduce the concentration of cholesterol and triglycerides which may be related to metabolic syndrome.(Pimienta-Barros etal) Xoconostle pears (Opuntia matudae) have attracted the attention of researchers around the world due to this … Continue reading Medicinal uses of Xoconostle

Xoconostle

The xoconostle (from Nahuatl xoconōchtli – ‘Xococ’ = ‘sour’ and ‘nochtli’ = tuna or prickly pear fruit) is native to central México and the arid semi-desert areas such as: Coahuila, Zacatecas, Jalisco, San Luis Potosi, Guanajuato, Queretaro, State of Mexico and Hidalgo. It is the fruit of a type of Opuntia cactus. There are more than 15 varieties of this fruit. Opuntia joconostle, O.chávena, O.lasiacantha Pfeiffer, O.matudae and O.delafuentiana are noted … Continue reading Xoconostle